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ASIS CTF Finals 2014 -- TicTac

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Description: Find flag in this file

After extracting data in the compressed file, we found a .pcap file. Analyze the file with Wireshark, we found there're lots of ICMP packets in it. After checking those packets with eyes wide-open, we found some interesting stuff : one of the ICMP packet contains the following data: 7069636b206d653a204153

At first I just think that this might be a part of a md5-encrypted string. But then I found that other packets contains similar data, too. I found that there's data like 7069636b206d653a203635, 7069636b206d653a203965...etc. Notice that there's a slight difference between those strings: their last 4 characters are different.

So I take a good look at those strings, and found that those were actually a string represent as hex values. If we convert those hex values into characters, 7069636b206d653a20 will be pick me:. So the string 7069636b206d653a204153 will be pick me: AS. This discovery got my attention, so I kept searching data that contains 7069636b206d653a20, and found that not only ICMP, but also IPv4 protocol contains these data. So I deicided to use strings and grep to get those data out of the file, and here's the result:

root@kali:~/Desktop# strings tictac.pcap | grep "7069636b206d653a20"
7069636b206d653a204153`
7069636b206d653a204153`
7069636b206d653a204953d
7069636b206d653a204953
7069636b206d653a205f36l
7069636b206d653a206435t
7069636b206d653a206435
7069636b206d653a203461l
7069636b206d653a203461
7069636b206d653a203637
7069636b206d653a203637
7069636b206d653a203635`
7069636b206d653a203635`
7069636b206d653a203965`
7069636b206d653a203965`
7069636b206d653a203435d
7069636b206d653a206564l
W27069636b206d653a206265`
7069636b206d653a203633t
7069636b206d653a206262
7069636b206d653a206639X
7069636b206d653a203039`
7069636b206d653a203039`
7069636b206d653a206536l
Z47069636b206d653a206231`
7069636b206d653a203833`
7069636b206d653a203833`
7069636b206d653a206120d
7069636b206d653a206120
7069636b206d653a20p
7069636b206d653a20
root@kali:~/Desktop#

Filter out the duplicate one, the final result will be like this:

7069636b206d653a204153
7069636b206d653a204953
7069636b206d653a205f36
7069636b206d653a206435
7069636b206d653a203461
7069636b206d653a203637
7069636b206d653a203635
7069636b206d653a203965
7069636b206d653a203435
7069636b206d653a206564
7069636b206d653a206265
7069636b206d653a203633
7069636b206d653a206262
7069636b206d653a206639
7069636b206d653a203039
7069636b206d653a206536
7069636b206d653a206231
7069636b206d653a203833
7069636b206d653a206120

We can see that there're totally 19 lines of data. Each data contains 2 characters in the flag, which means there're totaly 38 characters. The flag's format is ASIS_md5(xxx), which is a 37-characters string, so we can expect that if we combine the last 2 characters in each data, we'll know what the flag is. To do this, just write a python script and let the program do the rest.

getflag.py
f = open("data", "r")

flag = ""

for line in f:
    flag += chr(int(line[18:20],16)) 
    flag += chr(int(line[20:22],16))
    print flag

Boom! CTF ;)

flag: ASIS_6d54a67659e45edbe63bbf909e6b183a

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